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[/news/coronavirus/index.html Coronavirus] had killed the traditional 9 to 5, but the office will remain a key part of British working life, a new report has today claimed.
The publication warns workplaces 'will not return to normal' after the pandemic is brought under control - with employees having adapted to the 'new normal' of working from home during the Covid-19 lockdown.
But it describes speculation that the office is dead as 'misplaced'.
Instead, the office will still play a key role for white collar workers, many of whom actively want to return, the report adds.
This is driven partly by an increase in stress levels while working from home, as well as the a lack of personal development and loneliness, the report says.
It suggests workers splitting time between the office and working from home may be the way forward for many companies, even after once the pandemic is finished.
The report, released today, was commissioned for the British Contract Furnishing Association (BCFA), a business membership organisation representing firms within the furnishing industry.
Commenting on the findings, Jeremy Smith, managing director of the BCFA, said: 'The voice of officer workers and their employers has now been heard loud and clear - this report puts beyond doubt that the way people work is going to change.
The desire to return to the office is driven partly by an increase in stress levels while working from home, as well as the a lack of personal development and loneliness, with 30 per cent of remote workers struggling with loneliness while working remotely, the report says
Stress levels have gone up while people have been working from home according to the report, with many worrying about what managers think of their productivity while away from the office
The report says that a third managers did not trust their employees to work from home efficiently before the pandemic struck
'Home and remote working has lost its, often negative, reputation however, it is also clear that teams need space to grow, flourish and collaborate together, and the office of the future will need to support this if organisations are to be successful.
'The seismic change that has happened over the last several months is here to stay - the future will be a mix of people working from home and working and collaborating at the office.  
'This will have major implications across the country and we are urging government at all levels to take this into account as they make policy decisions for the future.'
The report, which collates information and surveys from dozens of publicly available studies, quotes one source which says 41 per cent of remote employees reported higher levels of stress compared with 25 per cent of their counterparts who are in the office.
Commenting on the findings, Jeremy Smith, managing director of the BCFA, said: 'The voice of officer workers and their employers has now been heard loud and clear - this report puts beyond doubt that the way people work is going to change.'
It says work-from-home employees worry about seeming unproductive - with one study finding that 46 per cent of employees felt under pressure to demonstrate they are truly working from home - including making sure they are ‘more responsive' on email.
Another study, the report highlights, by NordVPN, claimed that UK employees have been adding around two hours to each workday while working from home - meaning an extra working week per month.
The report says that the fears over productivity among workers comes despite other studies, highlighted in the publication, which show many businesses have seen an increase in productivity with staff working from home.
This includes a recent study by the International Workplace Group (IWG), which claimed 85 per cent of businesses had confirmed productivity increased as a result of having greater flexibility, with 63 per cent reporting a minimum 21 per cent improvement in productivity.
But the report also raises other issues with working from home.
It claims some workers, particularly younger employees who are less likely to have access to office space, have been working on kitchen tables, sofas and 'other unsuitable areas' while in lockdown.
Meanwhile, workers have reported internet and hardware issues, DA-100 Dumps4Success with 35 per cent saying have they have had issues with video conferencing software, such as Zoom, while 38 per cent have experienced problems with their firm's Virtual Private Network (VPN) - which are used as a security measure.
The report says workers have reported internet and hardware issues, with 35 per cent saying have they have had issues with video conferencing software, such as Zoom, while 38 per cent have experienced problems with their firm's Virtual Private Network (VPN) - which are used as a security measure
Office space take up is also down 35 per cent year or year according to the report, which office space deals put on hold or cancelled since March
Other issues raised in the report include loneliness - citing a study published by FinderUK which found that 30 per cent of remote workers say they struggle with loneliness when working remotely. 
<div class="art-ins mol-factbox floatRHS news" data-version="2" id="mol-94803da0-0e35-11eb-a1d4-41d822f02e4e" website will 'not return to normal' after pandemic, report predicts